10/02/2020 – Lunes de la 5ª semana de Tiempo Ordinario – Lecturas y santos del día.

PRIMERA LECTURA
Acarrearon el Arca de la Alianza al Santo de los Santos, y la nube llenó el templo del Señor.


Lectura del primer libro de los Reyes 8, 1-7. 9-13

En aquellos días, congregó Salomón a los ancianos de Israel en Jerusalén – todos los jefes de las tribus y los cabezas de familia de los hijos de Israel ante el rey – para hacer subir el Arca de la Alianza del Señor desde la ciudad de David, Sión.

En torno al rey Salomón se congregaron todos los varones de Israel. En el mes de etanín, el mes séptimo, por la fiesta, vinieron todos los ancianos de Israel y los sacerdotes condujeron el Arca e hicieron subir el Arca del Señor y la Tienda del Encuentro, con todos los objetos sagrados que había en ella.

El rey Salomón y todo Israel, la comunidad de Israel reunida en torno a él ante el Arca, sacrificaron ovejas y bueyes en número no calculable ni contable.

Los sacerdotes acarrearon el Arca de la Alianza del Señor al santuario del templo, el Santo de los Santos, a su lugar propio bajo las alas de los querubines. Estos extendían las alas sobre el lugar del Arca, cubriendo el Arca y sus varales.

No había en el Arca más que las dos tablas de piedra que Moisés depositó allí en el Horeb: las tablas de la alianza que estableció el Señor pacto con los hijos de Israel cuando salieron de la tierra de Egipto.

Cuando salieron los sacerdotes del santuario – pues ya la nube había llenado el templo del Señor -, no pudieron permanecer ante la nube para completar el servicio, ya que la gloria del Señor llenaba el templo del Señor.

Dijo entonces Salomón:

«El Señor puso el sol en el cielo, mas ha decidido habitar en densa nube. He querido erigirte una casa para morada tuya, un lugar donde habites para siempre».

Palabra de Dios.

Sal 131, 6-7. 8-10
R. Levántate, Señor, ven a tu mansión.

Oímos que estaba en Efrata,
la encontramos en el Soto de Jaar:
entremos en su morada,
postrémonos ante el estrado de sus pies. R.

Levántate, Señor, ven a tu mansión,
ven con el arca de tu poder:
que tus sacerdotes se vistan de justicia,
que tus fieles vitoreen.
Por amor a tu siervo David,
no niegues audiencia a tu Ungido. R.

Aleluya CF. Mt 4, 23
R. Aleluya, aleluya, aleluya.

Jesús proclamaba el evangelio del reino,
y curaba toda dolencia del pueblo. R.

EVANGELIO
Los que lo tocaban se curaban.

Lectura del santo Evangelio según san Marcos 6, 53-56

En aquel tiempo, terminada la travesía, Jesús y sus discípulos llegaron a Genesaret y atracaron.

Apenas desembarcados, lo reconocieron y se pusieron a recorrer toda la comarca; cuando se enteraba la gente dónde estaba Jesús, le llevaba los enfermos en camillas.

En los pueblos, ciudades o aldeas donde llegaba colocaban a los enfermos en la plaza y le rogaban que les dejase tocar al menos la orla de su manto; y los que lo tocaban se curaban.

Palabra del Señor.

10/02/2020 – Lunes de la 5ª semana de Tiempo Ordinario

Escolástica, virgen (c. a. 480-543)

Santos:

INGLÉS

READING OF THE DAY

A reading from the first book of Kings
1 KGS 8:1-7, 9-13

The elders of Israel and all the leaders of the tribes, the princes in the ancestral houses of the children of Israel, came to King Solomon in Jerusalem, to bring up the ark of the LORD’s covenant from the City of David, which is Zion.
All the people of Israel assembled before King Solomon during the festival in the month of Ethanim (the seventh month).
When all the elders of Isr el had arrived, the priests took up the ark; they carried the ark of the LORD and the meeting tent with all the sacred vessels that were in the tent.
(The priests and Levites carried them.)

King Solomon and the entire community of Israel present for the occasion sacrificed before the ark sheep and oxen too many to number or count.
The priests brought the ark of the covenant of the LORD to its place beneath the wings of the cherubim in the sanctuary, the holy of holies of the temple.
The cherubim had their wings spread out over the place of the ark, sheltering the ark and its poles from above.
There was nothing in the ark but the two stone tablets which Moses had put there at Horeb, when the LORD made a covenant with the children of Israel
at their departure from the land of Egypt.

When the priests left the holy place, the cloud filled the temple of the LORD so that the priests could no longer minister because of the cloud, since the LORD’s glory had filled the temple of the LORD.
Then Solomon said, “The LORD intends to dwell in the dark cloud; I have truly built you a princely house, a dwelling where you may abide forever.”

GOSPEL OF THE DAY

From the Gospel according to Mark
MK 6:53-56

After making the crossing to the other side of the sea, Jesus and his disciples came to land at Gennesaret and tied up there.
As they were leaving the boat, people immediately recognized him.
They scurried about the surrounding country and began to bring in the sick on mats to wherever they heard he was.
Whatever villages or towns or countryside he entered, they laid the sick in the marketplaces and begged him that they might touch only the tassel on his cloak; and as many as touched it were healed.

SAINT OF THE DAY

ST. SCHOLASTICA, VIRGIN, SISTER OF ST. BENEDETTO

“She was capable of more, who loved the more”

Scholastica, first Benedictine nun, lived between 480 and 543. A native of Nursia, she was a  very docile disciple of her brother, St. Benedict, with whom she vied for perfection of holiness, in learning the wisdom of the heart: so much so that she is said to have bested even her brother in charity.  In his Dialogues, the only reference text with a few references to the life of Saint Scholastica, St. Gregory the Great tells of one episode in particular, which reveals her strong human personality and spiritual depth.

The choice for religious life in the footsteps of her brother

According to reports, Scholastica, daughter of Eutropius, descendant of the ancient Roman senatorial family of the Anicii, and of Claudia, who died immediately after giving birth to twins, was sent to Rome at the age of 12, together with her brother, both of whom were deeply disturbed by the dissolute lifestyle that prevailed in that city. Benedict was the first to retire to a hermitage while Scholastica remained heir to the family, and, revealing detachment from earthly goods, asked her father to be allowed to dedicate herself to religious life, first entering a monastery near Nursia and then moving to Subiaco, following her brother who had founded the Abbey of Montecassino. There, just 7 kilometers away, she founded the monastery of Piumarola, where together with her sisters in religion she followed the Rule of St. Benedict, giving rise to the female branch of the Benedictine Order.

Rule of silence

Scholastica used to recommend observing the rule of silence, and avoiding conversation with people outside the monastery, even if they were devoted visitors. She used to say, “Either speak of God or keep silence, for, what in this world is so worthy of speech?” Of God, Scholastica loved to speak above all with her brother, Benedict, whom she would meet once a year. The place of their spiritual talks was a little house halfway between the two monasteries.

The miracle that challenges Benedict

Gregory tells that in the last of these meetings, dated 6 February 543, shortly before her death, Scholastica asked her brother to continue the interview until the following morning, but Benedict opposed her, saying it would break the Rule. Scholastica then implored the Lord not to let her brother depart, bursting into copious tears: immediately after, an unexpected and violent storm forced Benedict to stay, so that the two did talk all night. Noteworthy is Benedict’s reported initial  reaction to the sudden downpour: “Almighty God forgive you, sister. What have you done?” to which Scholastica answered, “See, I have asked you, and He has answered me. Now go out, if you can; leave me and go back to the monastery.” His sister’s riposte could not fail to please Benedict, for he himself had taught her to turn in difficulties to the One to whom everything is possible.

In life and in death united in God

Three days after this meeting, according to the story of Gregory, Benedict was informed of his sister’s death by a divine sign: he saw his sister’s soul ascend to Heaven in the form of a white dove. He then desired to bury her in the tomb he had set up for himself and where he too would be buried, a short time later. “As their minds had always been united in God, in the same way the bodies were joined in the same sepulcher.”

Those who arrive today – after fifteen centuries of history – to the majestic abbey of Montecassino, will live the emotion of being before of the tomb of the Holy Brother and Sister, guides to an unbroken chain of God-seekers down through the centuries and into the future.

 

[:en]

READING OF THE DAY

A reading from the first book of Kings
1 KGS 8:1-7, 9-13

The elders of Israel and all the leaders of the tribes, the princes in the ancestral houses of the children of Israel, came to King Solomon in Jerusalem, to bring up the ark of the LORD’s covenant from the City of David, which is Zion.
All the people of Israel assembled before King Solomon during the festival in the month of Ethanim (the seventh month).
When all the elders of Isr el had arrived, the priests took up the ark; they carried the ark of the LORD and the meeting tent with all the sacred vessels that were in the tent.
(The priests and Levites carried them.)

King Solomon and the entire community of Israel present for the occasion sacrificed before the ark sheep and oxen too many to number or count.
The priests brought the ark of the covenant of the LORD to its place beneath the wings of the cherubim in the sanctuary, the holy of holies of the temple.
The cherubim had their wings spread out over the place of the ark, sheltering the ark and its poles from above.
There was nothing in the ark but the two stone tablets which Moses had put there at Horeb, when the LORD made a covenant with the children of Israel
at their departure from the land of Egypt.

When the priests left the holy place, the cloud filled the temple of the LORD so that the priests could no longer minister because of the cloud, since the LORD’s glory had filled the temple of the LORD.
Then Solomon said, “The LORD intends to dwell in the dark cloud; I have truly built you a princely house, a dwelling where you may abide forever.”

GOSPEL OF THE DAY

From the Gospel according to Mark
MK 6:53-56

After making the crossing to the other side of the sea, Jesus and his disciples came to land at Gennesaret and tied up there.
As they were leaving the boat, people immediately recognized him.
They scurried about the surrounding country and began to bring in the sick on mats to wherever they heard he was.
Whatever villages or towns or countryside he entered, they laid the sick in the marketplaces and begged him that they might touch only the tassel on his cloak; and as many as touched it were healed.

“She was capable of more, who loved the more”

Scholastica, first Benedictine nun, lived between 480 and 543. A native of Nursia, she was a  very docile disciple of her brother, St. Benedict, with whom she vied for perfection of holiness, in learning the wisdom of the heart: so much so that she is said to have bested even her brother in charity.  In his Dialogues, the only reference text with a few references to the life of Saint Scholastica, St. Gregory the Great tells of one episode in particular, which reveals her strong human personality and spiritual depth.

The choice for religious life in the footsteps of her brother

According to reports, Scholastica, daughter of Eutropius, descendant of the ancient Roman senatorial family of the Anicii, and of Claudia, who died immediately after giving birth to twins, was sent to Rome at the age of 12, together with her brother, both of whom were deeply disturbed by the dissolute lifestyle that prevailed in that city. Benedict was the first to retire to a hermitage while Scholastica remained heir to the family, and, revealing detachment from earthly goods, asked her father to be allowed to dedicate herself to religious life, first entering a monastery near Nursia and then moving to Subiaco, following her brother who had founded the Abbey of Montecassino. There, just 7 kilometers away, she founded the monastery of Piumarola, where together with her sisters in religion she followed the Rule of St. Benedict, giving rise to the female branch of the Benedictine Order.

Rule of silence

Scholastica used to recommend observing the rule of silence, and avoiding conversation with people outside the monastery, even if they were devoted visitors. She used to say, “Either speak of God or keep silence, for, what in this world is so worthy of speech?” Of God, Scholastica loved to speak above all with her brother, Benedict, whom she would meet once a year. The place of their spiritual talks was a little house halfway between the two monasteries.

The miracle that challenges Benedict

Gregory tells that in the last of these meetings, dated 6 February 543, shortly before her death, Scholastica asked her brother to continue the interview until the following morning, but Benedict opposed her, saying it would break the Rule. Scholastica then implored the Lord not to let her brother depart, bursting into copious tears: immediately after, an unexpected and violent storm forced Benedict to stay, so that the two did talk all night. Noteworthy is Benedict’s reported initial  reaction to the sudden downpour: “Almighty God forgive you, sister. What have you done?” to which Scholastica answered, “See, I have asked you, and He has answered me. Now go out, if you can; leave me and go back to the monastery.” His sister’s riposte could not fail to please Benedict, for he himself had taught her to turn in difficulties to the One to whom everything is possible.

In life and in death united in God

Three days after this meeting, according to the story of Gregory, Benedict was informed of his sister’s death by a divine sign: he saw his sister’s soul ascend to Heaven in the form of a white dove. He then desired to bury her in the tomb he had set up for himself and where he too would be buried, a short time later. “As their minds had always been united in God, in the same way the bodies were joined in the same sepulcher.”

Those who arrive today – after fifteen centuries of history – to the majestic abbey of Montecassino, will live the emotion of being before of the tomb of the Holy Brother and Sister, guides to an unbroken chain of God-seekers down through the centuries and into the future.

[:zh]

READING OF THE DAY

A reading from the first book of Kings
1 KGS 8:1-7, 9-13

The elders of Israel and all the leaders of the tribes, the princes in the ancestral houses of the children of Israel, came to King Solomon in Jerusalem, to bring up the ark of the LORD’s covenant from the City of David, which is Zion.
All the people of Israel assembled before King Solomon during the festival in the month of Ethanim (the seventh month).
When all the elders of Isr el had arrived, the priests took up the ark; they carried the ark of the LORD and the meeting tent with all the sacred vessels that were in the tent.
(The priests and Levites carried them.)

King Solomon and the entire community of Israel present for the occasion sacrificed before the ark sheep and oxen too many to number or count.
The priests brought the ark of the covenant of the LORD to its place beneath the wings of the cherubim in the sanctuary, the holy of holies of the temple.
The cherubim had their wings spread out over the place of the ark, sheltering the ark and its poles from above.
There was nothing in the ark but the two stone tablets which Moses had put there at Horeb, when the LORD made a covenant with the children of Israel
at their departure from the land of Egypt.

When the priests left the holy place, the cloud filled the temple of the LORD so that the priests could no longer minister because of the cloud, since the LORD’s glory had filled the temple of the LORD.
Then Solomon said, “The LORD intends to dwell in the dark cloud; I have truly built you a princely house, a dwelling where you may abide forever.”

GOSPEL OF THE DAY

From the Gospel according to Mark
MK 6:53-56

After making the crossing to the other side of the sea, Jesus and his disciples came to land at Gennesaret and tied up there.
As they were leaving the boat, people immediately recognized him.
They scurried about the surrounding country and began to bring in the sick on mats to wherever they heard he was.
Whatever villages or towns or countryside he entered, they laid the sick in the marketplaces and begged him that they might touch only the tassel on his cloak; and as many as touched it were healed.

“She was capable of more, who loved the more”

Scholastica, first Benedictine nun, lived between 480 and 543. A native of Nursia, she was a  very docile disciple of her brother, St. Benedict, with whom she vied for perfection of holiness, in learning the wisdom of the heart: so much so that she is said to have bested even her brother in charity.  In his Dialogues, the only reference text with a few references to the life of Saint Scholastica, St. Gregory the Great tells of one episode in particular, which reveals her strong human personality and spiritual depth.

The choice for religious life in the footsteps of her brother

According to reports, Scholastica, daughter of Eutropius, descendant of the ancient Roman senatorial family of the Anicii, and of Claudia, who died immediately after giving birth to twins, was sent to Rome at the age of 12, together with her brother, both of whom were deeply disturbed by the dissolute lifestyle that prevailed in that city. Benedict was the first to retire to a hermitage while Scholastica remained heir to the family, and, revealing detachment from earthly goods, asked her father to be allowed to dedicate herself to religious life, first entering a monastery near Nursia and then moving to Subiaco, following her brother who had founded the Abbey of Montecassino. There, just 7 kilometers away, she founded the monastery of Piumarola, where together with her sisters in religion she followed the Rule of St. Benedict, giving rise to the female branch of the Benedictine Order.

Rule of silence

Scholastica used to recommend observing the rule of silence, and avoiding conversation with people outside the monastery, even if they were devoted visitors. She used to say, “Either speak of God or keep silence, for, what in this world is so worthy of speech?” Of God, Scholastica loved to speak above all with her brother, Benedict, whom she would meet once a year. The place of their spiritual talks was a little house halfway between the two monasteries.

The miracle that challenges Benedict

Gregory tells that in the last of these meetings, dated 6 February 543, shortly before her death, Scholastica asked her brother to continue the interview until the following morning, but Benedict opposed her, saying it would break the Rule. Scholastica then implored the Lord not to let her brother depart, bursting into copious tears: immediately after, an unexpected and violent storm forced Benedict to stay, so that the two did talk all night. Noteworthy is Benedict’s reported initial  reaction to the sudden downpour: “Almighty God forgive you, sister. What have you done?” to which Scholastica answered, “See, I have asked you, and He has answered me. Now go out, if you can; leave me and go back to the monastery.” His sister’s riposte could not fail to please Benedict, for he himself had taught her to turn in difficulties to the One to whom everything is possible.

In life and in death united in God

Three days after this meeting, according to the story of Gregory, Benedict was informed of his sister’s death by a divine sign: he saw his sister’s soul ascend to Heaven in the form of a white dove. He then desired to bury her in the tomb he had set up for himself and where he too would be buried, a short time later. “As their minds had always been united in God, in the same way the bodies were joined in the same sepulcher.”

Those who arrive today – after fifteen centuries of history – to the majestic abbey of Montecassino, will live the emotion of being before of the tomb of the Holy Brother and Sister, guides to an unbroken chain of God-seekers down through the centuries and into the future.

[:]

 

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